Category Archives: Recipes

Coffee or Tea?

Many people need a cup of good coffee for a good start into the day. In our case, we definitely need tea. Strong and sweet Assam tea! Typical and traditional "Ostfriesentee" (East-Frisian Tea)! Every morning! Boiling water in the camp early in the morning sometimes can be a really annoying task, especially when you've got to set up the stove et cetera first.

 

The Petromax Feuerkessel fk2 / Fire Kettle

 

Today, we try a new piece of gear which could simplify this process, the Petromax Feuerkanne fk 2 / Petromax Fire Kettle. Our first impression is that the Fire Kettle is quite big, which actually speaks against adding it to our gear as we need whatever space there is in the Land Rover.

The complete set-up consists of three pieces: the kettle, the fire bowl and an adaptor to add a "normal" kettle or pot on top of the Fire Kettle.

 

Little more than a handful of wood is needed!

 

For boiling one litre of water you only need about a handfull of wood. The kettle is double-walled, and so while branches, barks or pine cones burn and crackle in the fire bowl, the heat of the fire goes up through the inside of the kettle and brings the water inside the wall of the Fire Kettle to the boil.

 

The complete setup in action.

 

As soon as the water boils, the steam whistle starts whistling. In our case the start temperature of the water is 19.3°Celsius. To bring it to a boil, it takes only 4,5 minutes (our electric water boiler at home needs 3 minutes and 40 seconds). This speed really impresses us! ... At the same time the water in the pot on top of the kettle is heated up to 50°Celsius. If you need the hot water inside the Fire Kettle for making coffee, you can put a pot of milk on top to upgrade the coffee to wonderful latte macchiato.

 

Vietnamese - Ethiopian Coffee.

Ostfriesentee / East Frisian Tea

Latte Macchiato

 

Thanks to the three feet at the bottom of the fire bowl, the Fire Kettle leaves almost no traces of the fire behind and is steady whatever the surface. As we did not cut the lawn so far this year, minor damage is done to the vegetation.

 

The fire bowl.

Some traces left in the vegetation.

 

To sum up, the Petromax Feuerkanne fk 2 / Petromax Fire Kettle is an absolute winner, which definitely is going to travel with us to Africa in spite of it's size as it is really effective! What we still need, though, is a proper bag to put it in, as the insides of both the kettle and the fire bowl become really sooted.

 
 

We also tested the fire bowl to prepare Ethiopian coffee. But this process took longer than our "German patience" allowed us for now (more on the Ethiopian way of making coffee).

 

Roasting coffee beans.

 
 

What a perfume!

 

Thanks, Fräulein Anker!

Slow Food

Freshly baked rolls directly from the Dutch Oven

This time, we are posting two recipies "from the road" ... Food, for us, certainly is an important part of the travel experience and we love to experiment with local spices, ingredients and recipes.

At the campsite "Ons Dorpke" in Kiskunmajsa in Hungary, actually the most familistic campsite we have experienced so far, we sat around the campfire with the Belgian baker Marc and his wife Ilona whose parents originally came from Hungary. In planning dinner for the next following evening, we decided to cook together and combine Lecsó, a typically Hungarian recipe, with fresh rolls baked in our Dutch Oven (we have a Petromax Feuertopf). The following two recipies were tested on that evening and proved to be a really tasty, simple and cheap meal that can easily be cooked over the campfire / in the campfire ... and wonderfully goes along with a bottle of good Hungarian red wine.

Home-made Dutch Oven Rolls:

ingredients:

  • approx. 800 to 900g wheat flour (that's what we used; I'm sure, you could experiment with other flours as well)
  • 2 portions of dry yeast (roughly the same as 50g of yeast; sufficient for 1kg flour)
  • 3 tablespoons of salt
  • water
  • (1 to 3 soup spoons of olive-oil if you want the rolls to be fresh for another day)

Mix the dry yeast with a glass of warm water and put aside. Mix about one third of the flour with water (if you want to add oil, it's the right time now) and knead it. Then add the yeast and work it in thoroughly. Knead the dough until it has an evenconsistency. Add more flour and more water. In between you add about 3 tablespoons of salt (don't do it before, as it will harm the yeast's activity!) ... At the end of the kneading process, the dough should have the consistency of well-chewed chewing gum (but it should not stick to fingers or the bowl you knead it in! ... if it does, the dough does not have the right consistency!). Let the dough rise for at least half an hour (it's better to give it some more time!).

Preheat the Dutch Oven in the fire for about five minutes (closed).

Cover the bottom of the Dutch Oven with oil and then add enough flour so that the bottom of the Dutch Oven is covered completely about 1 to 2 mm high.

Form small rolls (they should fit into your cupped hands) and put six to eight of them into the Dutch Oven. Dab the top of the rolls with water to give them a brown crust later. Give them enough space to rise.

Put the Dutch Oven next to the fire for another ten to twenty minutes, first one side and then turn around the Dutch Oven after about five/ten minutes.

Put the Dutch Oven in the hot coals and cover the Dutch Oven's top with hot coals as well. If the fire is too hot, add some water around the Dutch Oven (on the fire and NOT directly on the Dutch Oven as that would harm the cast metal!).

After about 15 minutes in the fire, the rolls are ready.

Preheating the Dutch-Oven

Unbaked dough pieces

Rising period

Dutch Oven in Fire

Fire too hot

Freshly baked rolls

Home-made Hungarian Lecsó

ingredients:

  • sunflower oil
  • 1 to 2 onions
  • white Hungarian bell pepper (one bell pepper per person)
  • tomatoes (one per person)
  • a small tin of tomatoe paste
  • water
  • Hungarian Salami (according to taste)
  • salt, pepper, bell pepper powder (sweet) (according to taste)

Fry the onions in the sunflower oil until they are brown and then add the bell pepper. Let it fry for some time and stir from time to time. When the bell pepper starts to get brown add the tomatoes and let the vegetables simmer for some minutes. Add tomatoe paste, some water, salt, pepper and bell pepper powder and then the sliced Hungarian Salami. Let the Leczo simmer for about half an hour with the lid open until it's ready to be served.

Leczo with roll